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Hair Loss - Why?

Bigmac

Bigmac

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Staff member
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#1
Hair Loss - Why?
By Bradley Wolf, MD

Though humans no longer make use of hair for protection, heat retention, or camouflage, it still remains a very important means by which individuals display and are recognized. Appropriate appearance and grooming are still very important in social organization and the human relationships.
The human body contains approximately five million hair follicles while the scalp (prior to any kind of hair loss) contains 100,000 - 150,000 hair follicles. Blondes have the greatest number of scalp follicles, followed by brunettes. Humans with red hair have the fewest number of scalp follicles. The normal growth rate of scalp hair is one-fourth to one-half inch per month.

THE NORMAL HAIR GROWTH CYCLE

It is important to understand the normal hair growth cycle to understand why hair loss occurs. The hair follicle is an anatomical structure which evolved to produce and extrude (push out) a hair shaft. Hair is made up of proteins called keratins. Human hair grows in a continuous cyclic pattern of growth and rest known as the "hair growth cycle". Three phases of the cycle exist: Anagen= growth phase; Catagen=degradation phase; Telogen= resting phase. Periods of growth (anagen) between two and eight years are followed by a brief period, two to four weeks, in which the follicle is almost totally degraded (catagen). The resting phase (telogen) then begins and lasts two to four months. Shedding of the hair occurs only after the next growth cycle (anagen) begins and a new hair shaft begins to emerge. On average 50-100 telogen hairs are shed every day. This is normal hair loss and accounts for the hair loss seen every day in the shower and with hair combing. These hairs will regrow. Not more than 10 percent of the follicles are in the resting phase (telogen) at any time. A variety of factors can affect the hair growth cycle and cause temporary or permanent hair loss (alopecia) including medication, radiation, chemotherapy, exposure to chemicals, hormonal and nutritional factors, thyroid disease, generalized or local skin disease, and stress.
Androgens (testosterone, dihydrotestosterone) are the most important control factors of human hair growth. Androgens must be present for the growth of beard, axillary (underarm),and pubic hair. Growth of scalp hair is NOT androgen-dependent but androgens are necessary for the development of male and female pattern hair loss.

MALE PATTERN HAIR LOSS (Androgenetic Alopecia)

It is estimated that 35 million men in the United States are affected by androgenetic alopecia. "Andro" refers to the androgens (testosterone, dihydrotestosterone) necessary to produce male-pattern hair loss (MPHL). "Genetic" refers to the inherited gene necessary for MPHL to occur. In men who develop MPHL the hair loss may begin any time after puberty when blood levels of androgens rise. The first change is usually recession in the temporal areas, which is seen in 96 percent of mature Caucasian males, including those men not destined to progress to further hair loss. Hamilton and later Norwood have classified the patterns of MPHL (See Norwood-Hamilton Scale). Although the density of hair in a given pattern of loss tends to diminish with age, there is no way to predict what pattern of hair loss a young man with early MPHL will eventually assume. In general, those who begin losing hair in the second decade are those in whom the hair loss will be the most severe. In some men, initial male-pattern hair loss may be delayed until the late third to fourth decade. It is generally recognized that men in their 20 €™s have a 20 percent incidence of MPHL, in their 30 €™s a 30 percent incidence of MPHL, in their 40 €™s a 40 percent incidence of MPLH, etc. Using these numbers one can see that a male in his 90 €™s has a 90 percent chance of having some degree of MPHL.
Hamilton first noted that androgens (testosterone, dihydrotestosterone) are necessary for the development of MPHL. The amount of androgens present does not need to be greater than normal for MPHL to occur. If androgens are present in normal amounts and the gene for hair loss is present, male pattern hair loss will occur. Axillary (under arm) and pubic hair are dependent on testosterone for growth. Beard growth and male pattern hair loss are dependent on dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Testosterone is converted to DHT by the enzyme, 5a -reductase. Finasteride (Propecia) acts by blocking this enzyme and decreasing the amount of DHT. Receptors exist on cells that bind androgens. These receptors have the greatest affinity for DHT followed by testosterone, estrogen, and progesterone. After binding to the receptor, DHT goes into the cell and interacts with the nucleus of the cell altering the production of protein by the DNA in the nucleus of the cell. Ultimately growth of the hair follicle ceases.
The hair growth cycle (see "The Normal Hair Growth Cycle") is affected in that the percentage of hairs in the growth phase (anagen) and the duration of the growth phase diminish resulting in shorter hairs. More hairs are in the resting state (telogen) and these hairs are much more subject to loss with the daily trauma of combing and washing. The hair shafts in MPHL become progressively miniaturized, smaller in diameter and length, with time. In men with MPHL all the hairs in an affected area may eventually (but not necessarily) become involved in the process and may with time cover the region with fine (vellus) hair. Pigment (color) production is also terminated with miniaturization so the fine hair becomes lighter in color. The lighter color, miniaturized hairs cause the area to first appear thin. Involved areas in men can completely lose all follicles over time. MPHL is an inherited condition and the gene can be inherited from either the mother or father €™s side. There is a common myth that inheritance is only from the mother €™s side. This is not true.

In summary, male pattern hair loss (Androgenetic Alopecia) is an inherited condition manifested when androgens are present in normal amounts. The gene can be inherited from the mother or father €™s side. The onset, rate, and severity of hair loss are unpredictable. The severity increases with age and if the condition is present it will be progressive and relentless.

FEMALE PATTERN HAIR LOSS (Androgenetic Alopecia)

Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) differs from male pattern hair loss (MPHL) in the following ways. It is more likely to be noticed later than in men, in the late twenties through early forties. It is likely to be seen at times of hormonal change, i.e., use of birth control pills, after childbirth, around the time of menopause, and after menopause. Recession at the temples is less likely than in men and women tend to maintain the position of their hairlines. Like in men, the entire top of the scalp is the area of risk. In women there is generally a diffuse thinning throughout the area as opposed to thinning in the crown of men. Ludwig has classified hair loss in women into three classes. (See Ludwig Classification) The vast majority of women affected fall into the Ludwig I class.

In the United States it is estimated that 21 million women are affected by FPHL. The incidence in women has been reported to be as low as eight percent and as high as 87 percent. It does appear to be as common in women as in men. The hair loss in women becomes particularly notable in menopause.
Androgens are responsible for hair loss in women by the same mechanisms they cause hair loss in men. Women do produce small amounts of androgens by way of the ovaries and adrenal glands. Also prehormones are produced by the ovaries that are converted to androgens outside of the ovaries or adrenal glands. Women rarely experience total loss of hair in an area if the loss is due to FPHL. If they do they should be evaluated for an underlying pathological (disease) condition. In women, the process of miniaturization of the hair follicle is more random with some hair being unaffected. Normal thick hairs are mixed with finer, smaller diameter hairs. The end result is a visual decrease in density of hair rather than total loss of hair. The hair growth cycle is affected as in men. The growth phase (anagen) is shortened resulting in shorter hairs and the resting phase (telogen) is increased resulting in fewer hairs.

If the cause of hair loss is suspected to be abnormally elevated or decreased amounts of hormones the patient should undergo laboratory tests to measure hormone levels.








 
Bigmac

Bigmac

Administrator
Staff member
Likes
19
#4
Yea i have to agree its a well written article and very informative.

Dr Wolf is a great doctor.

bm.
 
bullitnut

bullitnut

4 awesome repairs with SMG
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24
#7
great article from a great doctor made good reading thanks for posting;)
 
J

jacob

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#9
it is really a very nice post....have you written this article on your own...this is amazing and great learning...
 
R

ramy09

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#12
Vitamin B is needed for hair to remain healthy. For hair loss, biotin is an essential natural nutrient, found in Provillus that also aids in the regrowth of hair. Biotin is the vitamin B that makes keratin, which can stop your hair from turning gray and falling out. It also helps to metabolize fats and carbohydrates. Niacin is another vitamin B that helps improve blood circulation to the scalp.
__________________________________________________________
 
R

ramy09

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0
#13
Hormonal problems may cause hair loss. If your thyroid gland is overactive or underactive, your hair may fall out. This hair loss usually can be helped by treatment thyroid disease.
___________________
 
M

miofit

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#14
Good article and very informative post. Thanks a lot. But what is the best vitamin for hair?
 
Bigmac

Bigmac

Administrator
Staff member
Likes
19
#15
Check all nutritional labels before taking any supplements to determine your daily allowance. Believe it or not, it is possible to overdose on vitamins and minerals, and taking too much of these could possibly result in hair loss, or other health related issues.

Vitamin A- An antioxidant that helps maintain natural oils in the scalp. Can be found in milk, eggs, cheese, meats, spinach, broccoli, and cabbage.

Calcium - Helps hair growth. Can be found in dairy, nuts, and beans.

Vitamin C - One of nature's most powerful antioxidants. Maintains healthy hair and skin. Can be found in fruits, potatoes, and green vegetables.

Chromium - Helps regulate blood sugar levels, which affects hair loss. Can be found in beef and whole wheat bread.

Vitamin E- An antioxidant that benefits scalp circulation. Can be found in vegetable oils, nuts, beans, and green vegetables.

Copper - Strengthens the hair and prevents hair loss. Can be found in shellfish, green vegetables, eggs, beans, and chicken.

Biotin - Produces keratin, which makes up the hair, skin, and nails. Can be found in eggs, whole grains, rice, and milk.

Iodine - Prevents dry hair and hair loss. Can be found in fish, seaweed, garlic, and iodized salt.

Inositol - Promotes follicle health. Can be found in whole grains and citrus fruits.

Iron - Prevents hair loss and anemia. Can be found in eggs, fish, chicken, whole grains, green vegetables, and dried fruits.

Vitamin B3 (Niacin) - Improves scalp circulation. Can be found in fish, chicken, turkey, and other meats.

Magnesium - Helps hair growth by working with calcium. Can be found in whole grains, green vegetables, nuts, and fish.

Vitamin B5 (Pantothenic Acid) - Prevents hair loss. Can be found in whole grains, eggs, and certain meats.

Manganese - Improves hair growth. Can be found in whole grains, eggs, nuts, beans, fish, and chicken.

Vitamin B6 - Prevents hair loss. Can be found in whole grains, vegetables, eggs, and certain meats.

Potassium - Promotes circulation and helps hair growth. Can be found in bananas, brown rise, garlic, nuts, dried fruits, raisins, and yogurt.

Vitamin B12 - Prevents hair loss. Can be found in eggs, fish, chicken, and milk.

Selenium - Promotes scalp health. Can be found in fish, whole grains, certain meats, and broccoli.

Silica - Creates stronger hair. Can be found in seafood, rice, and green vegetables.

Sulfur - Creates stronger hair. Can be found in garlic, eggs, onions, milk, cheese, and fish.

Zinc - Prevents dry hair and oily skin by working with Vitamin A. Can be found in mushrooms, spinach, whole grains, and red meat.

By creating a natural diet that provides the above vitamins and minerals, you can help prevent hair loss and even stimulate hair growth. It is also beneficial to take a daily vitamin that provides the above ingredients.







Article from http://EzineArticles.com/?expert=Matt_Adler


 
V

vnspramod

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#16
There are some common reasons that cause excessive hair loss. For example, about 3 or 4 months after an illness or a major surgery, you may suddenly lose a large amount of hair. This hair loss is related to the stress of the illness and is temporary.

One reason also has very large effect on the hair loss i.e. hormonal problems. If your thyroid gland is overactive or underactive, your hair may fall out. This hair loss usually can be helped by treatment thyroid disease. Hair loss may occur if male or female hormones, known as androgens and estrogens, are out of balance. Correcting the hormone imbalance may stop your hair loss.
 

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smithgerry

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#17
I would like to thank you for the efforts you have made in writing this article. There are different factors which is cause hair loss, like smoking, depression, stress etc. Hair care products are a large industry. So try it which is best for you.
 
A

andyking

Member
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0
#18
Bigmac wrote:
Hair Loss - Why?
By Bradley Wolf, MD

Though humans no longer make use of hair for protection, heat retention, or camouflage, it still remains a very important means by which individuals display and are recognized. Appropriate appearance and grooming are still very important in social organization and the human relationships.
The human body contains approximately five million hair follicles while the scalp (prior to any kind of hair loss) contains 100,000 - 150,000 hair follicles. Blondes have the greatest number of scalp follicles, followed by brunettes. Humans with red hair have the fewest number of scalp follicles. The normal growth rate of scalp hair is one-fourth to one-half inch per month.

THE NORMAL HAIR GROWTH CYCLE

It is important to understand the normal hair growth cycle to understand why hair loss occurs. The hair follicle is an anatomical structure which evolved to produce and extrude (push out) a hair shaft. Hair is made up of proteins called keratins. Human hair grows in a continuous cyclic pattern of growth and rest known as the "hair growth cycle". Three phases of the cycle exist: Anagen= growth phase; Catagen=degradation phase; Telogen= resting phase. Periods of growth (anagen) between two and eight years are followed by a brief period, two to four weeks, in which the follicle is almost totally degraded (catagen). The resting phase (telogen) then begins and lasts two to four months. Shedding of the hair occurs only after the next growth cycle (anagen) begins and a new hair shaft begins to emerge. On average 50-100 telogen hairs are shed every day. This is normal hair loss and accounts for the hair loss seen every day in the shower and with hair combing. These hairs will regrow. Not more than 10 percent of the follicles are in the resting phase (telogen) at any time. A variety of factors can affect the hair growth cycle and cause temporary or permanent hair loss (alopecia) including medication, radiation, chemotherapy, exposure to chemicals, hormonal and nutritional factors, thyroid disease, generalized or local skin disease, and stress.
Androgens (testosterone, dihydrotestosterone) are the most important control factors of human hair growth. Androgens must be present for the growth of beard, axillary (underarm),and pubic hair. Growth of scalp hair is NOT androgen-dependent but androgens are necessary for the development of male and female pattern hair loss.

MALE PATTERN HAIR LOSS (Androgenetic Alopecia)

It is estimated that 35 million men in the United States are affected by androgenetic alopecia. "Andro" refers to the androgens (testosterone, dihydrotestosterone) necessary to produce male-pattern hair loss (MPHL). "Genetic" refers to the inherited gene necessary for MPHL to occur. In men who develop MPHL the hair loss may begin any time after puberty when blood levels of androgens rise. The first change is usually recession in the temporal areas, which is seen in 96 percent of mature Caucasian males, including those men not destined to progress to further hair loss. Hamilton and later Norwood have classified the patterns of MPHL (See Norwood-Hamilton Scale). Although the density of hair in a given pattern of loss tends to diminish with age, there is no way to predict what pattern of hair loss a young man with early MPHL will eventually assume. In general, those who begin losing hair in the second decade are those in whom the hair loss will be the most severe. In some men, initial male-pattern hair loss may be delayed until the late third to fourth decade. It is generally recognized that men in their 20 €™s have a 20 percent incidence of MPHL, in their 30 €™s a 30 percent incidence of MPHL, in their 40 €™s a 40 percent incidence of MPLH, etc. Using these numbers one can see that a male in his 90 €™s has a 90 percent chance of having some degree of MPHL.
Hamilton first noted that androgens (testosterone, dihydrotestosterone) are necessary for the development of MPHL. The amount of androgens present does not need to be greater than normal for MPHL to occur. If androgens are present in normal amounts and the gene for hair loss is present, male pattern hair loss will occur. Axillary (under arm) and pubic hair are dependent on testosterone for growth. Beard growth and male pattern hair loss are dependent on dihydrotestosterone (DHT). Testosterone is converted to DHT by the enzyme, 5a -reductase. Finasteride (Propecia) acts by blocking this enzyme and decreasing the amount of DHT. Receptors exist on cells that bind androgens. These receptors have the greatest affinity for DHT followed by testosterone, estrogen, and progesterone. After binding to the receptor, DHT goes into the cell and interacts with the nucleus of the cell altering the production of protein by the DNA in the nucleus of the cell. Ultimately growth of the hair follicle ceases.
The hair growth cycle (see "The Normal Hair Growth Cycle") is affected in that the percentage of hairs in the growth phase (anagen) and the duration of the growth phase diminish resulting in shorter hairs. More hairs are in the resting state (telogen) and these hairs are much more subject to loss with the daily trauma of combing and washing. The hair shafts in MPHL become progressively miniaturized, smaller in diameter and length, with time. In men with MPHL all the hairs in an affected area may eventually (but not necessarily) become involved in the process and may with time cover the region with fine (vellus) hair. Pigment (color) production is also terminated with miniaturization so the fine hair becomes lighter in color. The lighter color, miniaturized hairs cause the area to first appear thin. Involved areas in men can completely lose all follicles over time. MPHL is an inherited condition and the gene can be inherited from either the mother or father €™s side. There is a common myth that inheritance is only from the mother €™s side. This is not true.

In summary, male pattern hair loss (Androgenetic Alopecia) is an inherited condition manifested when androgens are present in normal amounts. The gene can be inherited from the mother or father €™s side. The onset, rate, and severity of hair loss are unpredictable. The severity increases with age and if the condition is present it will be progressive and relentless.

FEMALE PATTERN HAIR LOSS (Androgenetic Alopecia)

Female pattern hair loss (FPHL) differs from male pattern hair loss (MPHL) in the following ways. It is more likely to be noticed later than in men, in the late twenties through early forties. It is likely to be seen at times of hormonal change, i.e., use of birth control pills, after childbirth, around the time of menopause, and after menopause. Recession at the temples is less likely than in men and women tend to maintain the position of their hairlines. Like in men, the entire top of the scalp is the area of risk. In women there is generally a diffuse thinning throughout the area as opposed to thinning in the crown of men. Ludwig has classified hair loss in women into three classes. (See Ludwig Classification) The vast majority of women affected fall into the Ludwig I class.

In the United States it is estimated that 21 million women are affected by FPHL. The incidence in women has been reported to be as low as eight percent and as high as 87 percent. It does appear to be as common in women as in men. The hair loss in women becomes particularly notable in menopause.
Androgens are responsible for hair loss in women by the same mechanisms they cause hair loss in men. Women do produce small amounts of androgens by way of the ovaries and adrenal glands. Also prehormones are produced by the ovaries that are converted to androgens outside of the ovaries or adrenal glands. Women rarely experience total loss of hair in an area if the loss is due to FPHL. If they do they should be evaluated for an underlying pathological (disease) condition. In women, the process of miniaturization of the hair follicle is more random with some hair being unaffected. Normal thick hairs are mixed with finer, smaller diameter hairs. The end result is a visual decrease in density of hair rather than total loss of hair. The hair growth cycle is affected as in men. The growth phase (anagen) is shortened resulting in shorter hairs and the resting phase (telogen) is increased resulting in fewer hairs.

If the cause of hair loss is suspected to be abnormally elevated or decreased amounts of hormones the patient should undergo laboratory tests to measure hormone levels.
Medical Scientists believe that MPHL (Male Pattern Hair Loss) is due to two reasons. First is inherited from the either sides of the family. Second is due to biological chemical called a dihydrotestosterone, commonly referred as DHT. DHT is a biological material in the body, which shrinks the hair follicle.

Male pattern hair loss is a widespread situation, where men encounter disappearing of hair on the scalp. This also results in receding hairline or balding on the scalp area of the head. There is a need to find a medicine that stabilizes the overall DHT level and help stop follicles.

I'm 40 and have a hair loss problem since last 5 yrs. I tried many drugs, shampoos, gels and creams and finally Propecia Finasteride worked for me. Generic Propecia contains the active ingredient Finasteride, a type II 5-alpha reductase drug that restricts the conversion of testosterone to dihydrotestosterone. It certainly has some side effects. I too had experienced side effect like decreasing sexual desire in the beginning but as my body got used to it slowly, the side effect disappeared.

After year and a half, today I am satisfied with the result. I am buying propecia from emedoutlet. These guys are best in quality and fast in delivery. Propecia 1mg costs $ 16/- for ONE MONTHS OF SUPPLY. Recently, I have recd 15% discount coupon. The discount coupon number is 5234E. You also can take an advantage of free shipping with code 4848B - You can use either Discount code or free shipping code, you can not use both at a time. If any one of you want to buy propecia and want to take advantage of discount or free shipping, you can try these coupon codes. I believe it should work for you also.








 
Last edited:
J

jasikajohnson

Member
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0
#19
Hair loss due to a level of hormone,pregnancy,imbalanced in diet,stress this are the factor affecting a hair loss,you take a healthy food that contain a more vitamin and do massage with oil regular and use a natural things for a hair this way you stop hair loss.
 
D

drrenuka

Member
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0
#20
Still today it is a big confused question that :
What Causes Hair Loss? Why it happens...
There are many reasons for hair loss. If hair loss is sudden and severe, then the cause may be due to some disease, medicines, diet, or even child birth. The gradual hair loss that becomes prominent over the years is actually hereditary hair loss. Hair experts and dermatologists says that certain hair care practices can also cause considerable hair loss.

Well it may happen because of some disease, some disorder, stress and hormones or because of our daily diet. But how can we get our answer from all of these reasons..for all of the hair related problems. ;)