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Halo

S

Steve10

member
I'm thinking of having top and crown HT.

But I'm concerned that in time the sides drop and vortex(?) crown widens that I will need top ups.

This topic doesn't seem to get much attention.

So, it appears that the transition is critical. Also, I'm thinking I would be best to only do the top.

Extracted from this site:

The vertex zone will continually expand over time. The process is unrelenting. The five-year study conducted by Merck on male pattern baldness clearly demonstrated the progressive non-relenting course of male pattern baldness. Because of the progressive nature of male pattern hair loss, this Vertex represents a true paradox to surgeons. Transplanting this area generally satisfies both the patient's and the surgeon's short-term goals. However, the long-term cosmesis can be quite a different matter. As hair loss progresses, a halo of baldness will form around the transplanted zone. This appearance has no counterpart in nature and can be quite bizarre. Fortunately, most cases can
be restored to a natural appearance with further transplanting. The long-term solutions may be less easily addressed. Limitations of transplantation are imposed due to the requirement of a large percentage of the donor reserves. Once the donor hair reserves become depleted, the halo will continue to progress and the "black hole" or the "bottomless pit" (referencing the fact that this area can consume the entire donor area and still leave the surgeon and patient desiring more grafts) becomes a major concern. Because there is no permanent border, the peripheral
border will keep migrating, which will result in an island of central hair. This isolated tuft of transplanted hair can thus become more of a concern than the original bald or thinning state. Lessons of the past have shown that scalp reductions alone will not eliminate this problem. Taking this into consideration, can the vertex be safely transplanted? If we possessed a crystal ball to aid in determining the extent of hair loss through one's lifetime, then the vertex area could be transplanted with complete impunity. Currently, we cannot do so. The surgeon must realize
the tremendous risk he or she replaces a patient in when transplanting this area.

Another good reason to consider conserving donor is if the sides drop you might be better off having some hair in the bank to connect the sides back up with the top as this would matter more for most then having the crown work.

Thoughts?
 
M

MPBsucks1234

Valued member
Any photos? Yes the crown my well expand so it is important to plan accordingly, many clinics will not operate in the crown region until a patient is at least 35 and balding pattern established. My crown started thinning in my mid twenties and by 28 was expanding as well.
 
Bigmac

Bigmac

Administrator
Staff member
Hair loss meds are worth considering especially when crown restoration is needed. Your age and balding pattern will help a clinic determine the best approach.
 
S

Steve10

member
If you have crown work done isn't it inevitable when you get to your 70s and 80s that when hair loss continues that a halo type effect will happen to the crown and even the sides as they drop?
 
Bigmac

Bigmac

Administrator
Staff member
Who is to say that your sides will drop.
 
Bigmac

Bigmac

Administrator
Staff member
My dad lost his crown only. My oldest brother was slick bald by 40. Next oldest brother crown is just starting to thin in his 60`s. My crown was similar do my dads. Hopefully, you won't follow your dads pattern.
 
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