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Shock loss

H

Hairforever

Valued member
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0
#1
I was never really aware of shock loss after a hair transplant until my last disasterous one. Prior to that I'd had 5 (yes regretfully five) smallish hair transplants with not much shock loss to write home about.

My question is why did I get shockloss the last time. It happened about 2 1/2 weeks after so-called FUE procedure. I first noticed a small coin shaped bald patch about half way up from my hair line on the left hand side where my parting would start. Horrifically it then spread to about two-thirds of the front. Now this wasn't loss of native hair - this was previously transplanted (stable) hair. It took a good 6 months for it to grow back but at least it did (though I didn't notice any transplanted hairs making an appearance). Was it simply down to the gross incompetence of their 'doctor'? My head was shaved to convict grade so surely placing the hairs would have been easy?

What I'd like to know from your surgeons out there is what you do to minimise the chances of shock loss. I'm really hoping SMG will be able to carry out my procedure without my returning to work with a bald head. I can only use alopecia as an excuse so many times![):h::


 
Bigmac

Bigmac

Administrator
Staff member
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8
#2
When choosing a good doctor to perform your surgery you are minimising all risks asscciated with surgery,however they still can happen.

I believe SMG will take the upmost care of you and that you`ll return to work with no worries.

As to shockloss,here is an abstract from Spexs HT guide regarding this.

Shockloss

Shockloss is something that can be experienced when transplanting into existing hair although highly unpredictable. Shockloss occurs when the native hair is weak and isn't strong enough to resist the trauma thats going on around it. More often than not the hair that has gone into shock will grow back but after 3/4 months - after the resting phase
Hair that goes into shock and doesn't return is hair that was inevitably on its way out anyway and wasn't strong enough to return.
Increased trauma to a localised area will increase the chances of shockloss
Shockloss is unpredictable and there is no hard and fast rule to avoiding it - especially if you are transplanting into existing hair.

There are risk factors that either heighten or lessen someone's risk. Diffuse thinners seem more prone to shockloss than receders because the hair in a diffuse area is often less stable than that of a receder. Very often, a lot of the hair in a diffuse area is "on its last legs" and in the latter stages of the miniaturization process.

Hope this helps.

Take care

bm.
 
H

Hairforever

Valued member
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0
#3
Thanks for the information Bigmac. I believe that the majority of the donor hair will be implanted between previously transplanted hair so hopefully shock loss won't be a problem this time. Having said that it was non-native, strong transplanted hair that managed to shock for 6 months - I'm hoping it was their incompetence that was the cause of this.