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Temple Restoration

G

Guest

Guest
#1
Hello,

I was contemplating having my last transplant to fill in my temples and add some grafts to my donor scar which has stretched in one small area. Would my surrounding hair be safe from "Shockloss"?... mainly around the scar as I don`t want to make it more visible.
I was thinking of maybe 500 - 600 grafts via Fue as this will be adequate to complete my goal.

So, Is there a way I can guarantee I won`t suffer any form of "Shockloss"?



 
janna

janna

Invaluable Member
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0
#2
Hi Weasle,

I don't think there's anyway to guarantee anyone that they won't experience shock loss. In most cases it's temporary.
 
H

hairtech

valued member
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#3
Shockloss is very rare... Statistically when it happens, it should re-grow... however, it might not. There is no way to predict shockloss in anyone.
 
Bigmac

Bigmac

Administrator
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#4
With a small procedure you should be able to leave your hair long enough to conceal any work done and if you do suffer from shockloss your native hair should cover it.

Hope that makes sense.
 
sl

sl

BHR Clinic Patient Advisor
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#5
The medical term for shock loss is effluvium, meaning shedding. This can occur when grafts are placed in an area which has hair already, there can be some trauma and tissue reaction to the surgery and medications used that can cause the existing hair to shed prematurely. Shock loss usually affects the miniaturised hair nearing the end of its life span and is most likely to be shed at some point in the near future. Some healthy hair will be shed, but it invariably regrows. Shock loss is more common when a large session is performed through thinning hair. Shock loss can also occur in the donor area, more so with larger strip procedures, it is less common, but can still occur.

For most patients, effluvium is not a major issue and should not be a cause for concern, their hair looks a little thinner or loses some body and lustre. This is generally during the first months post the transplant when the transplanted hair is still in the dormant phase.

It is certainly easier to place grafts around hair that is shaved, so in this case along the hair line slightly into the native hair, maybe a few cms, when shaved it is not as noticeable because the hair length. Incisions must be customised to the individual patient, if you limit/customise the size of the incision site, and limit the width and length of the tool used to make recipient sites then you can greatly reduce the chances of shock loss. There seems to be a multitude of factors that can help reduce the effects of shock loss, ceasing smoking/drinking in the coming days to the procedure for example.
 
Sparky

Sparky

Valued member
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#6
If I had any shockloss with fue, I didnt see it, an I was shaved own to a skinhea, so it would of been obvious on me.
 
G

Guest

Guest
#8
Ok, so I may suffer some "shockloss". What could be the worst case scenario? Could I suffer permanent loss... If this happens I would need another session to replace what I`ve lost..... and so on.

}:BY:>?
 
Bigmac

Bigmac

Administrator
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#9
Shockloss has no time period but usually it only lasts for a few months at most.

Permanent shockloss is rare imo and if you experience it,it is usually miniaturised hair that was on its way out anyway.A doctor can check for these hairs when you see him/her and advise you accordingly.
 
G

Guest

Guest
#10
Okay, if I decide to excise the scar... what are the chances of permanent "shockloss" above - below the scar as I`ve heard second and third procedures have a higher chance of not turning out as expected.
 
H

hairtech

valued member
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#11
hey bro... no one in this forum can predict ANY shockloss for ya...

I dare any poster here that can...