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Let`s talk Mental Health and depression due to hair loss

Kevboy

Kevboy

Valued member
Yeah I'd say depression is certainly in the category of mental health issues pal and I can totally relate to wanting to smack people who make comments......really gets my goat how its considered by some wrong to say people are overweight etc but ok to shatter a guys confidence by taking the mickey out of hairloss.

Thanks for sharing

It is cruel and unfair that balding guys are openly made fun of and no one seems to bat an eyelid. Why is it acceptable to ridicule a man for losing his hair but not a woman? Not that I think a woman is fair game.
 
T

Teh Daddeh

Valued member
It is cruel and unfair that balding guys are openly made fun of and no one seems to bat an eyelid. Why is it acceptable to ridicule a man for losing his hair but not a woman? Not that I think a woman is fair game.
I totally agree.

Certain physical aspects of humans are protected - skin colour, weight, disabilities etc but not balding. Totally arbitrary double standards.
 
JoeTillman

JoeTillman

Valued member
As Spencer Kobren has been saying for nearly 20 years, male pattern hair loss is the last bastion of political incorrectness. Don't you DARE even mention a woman's weight, but have fun making a 21 year old kid fighting to find his own self worth and identity feel like he is a loser and has no business trying to socialize in this world because of his genetic fate.

I will disagree with one thing you said, Bullitnut.
All I'm saying guys is take care of your mental health it's important... then get a HT.
I think it is better for everyone to take care of their mental health and then making the decision to have a hair transplant, or not, will be easier to make.
 
JoeTillman

JoeTillman

Valued member
...must be so hard for a doctor as well who gives a patient a great result but due to the patients health it doesnt make them happy.
It is very hard. I remember several cases where a patient was unhappy even after I was scratching my head wondering what I was missing. I remember one case in particular when I was visiting a foreign country with a doctor and we were meeting a patient that had had his procedure roughly a year prior with us. He walked in and was obviously down about something. He wanted to know why his hair had not grown. I wish I had a photo of my reaction because I'm sure I looked dumbfounded, since that is how I felt. He had a turn around that would have had the web going nuts yet he could not tell the difference. It is an extreme example, yes, but I've run across multiple cases since, albeit not nearly as severe, that were similar. I remember the doctor having a look of excitement but then once the issue was revealed, he himself was depressed for the rest of the day as he really felt bad for the patient. It is one of those situations where saying one feels helpless to help doesn't even begin to scratch the surface.
 
L

LondonMayor

member
I think it is better for everyone to take care of their mental health and then making the decision to have a hair transplant, or not, will be easier to make.
I agree fully agree with you on this.

A HT shouldn't be viewed as the only panacea to someone's metal health problems. An overall healthy lifestyle, striking the right balance with family, friends, physical health, career, finances, love life, therapy etc can all go a long way to helping you with your mental health.
 
A

Andrewored

member
Hair loss can affect a person’s sense of self worth and identity, it did with me. I first noticed my hair thinning in my late teens to the point I developed a visible bald patch on my crown. I became the butt of jokes from people who were my friends. This caused psycho-emotional and psychosocial stress that required several years of therapy.
Some of the psychosocial effects I endured was the humiliation by others leading to my low self-esteem, stress, depression and a feeling of worthlessness. This decreased my social engagements and ultimately lead to self-isolation.
Eventually, with support from my parents I received medical therapy that pulled me through. I am older and wiser, although hair loss is still something that bothers me, that's why I'm here. I have learnt there are more important things in life than hair. Who knows, one day I might go for a hair transplant, I've done extensive research but for now, I can get away with a short cut and the occasional use of Toppik.
The support this community offers is fantastic, however, seeking professional help as soon as possible is a priority. Don't be embarrassed reaching out for help, as men we often see it as a weakness. Women are better at talking about personal problems.
Stay strong and healthy everyone.
 
C

Coopman

Valued member
Andrew

Your words "I can get away with a short cut and the occasional use of Toppik" is my philosophy.
I spoke to a young guy once who's dream was to have enough hair on top so he could use concealor. He had mental health issues but his aims were realistic.
 
A

Andrewored

member
Andrew

Your words "I can get away with a short cut and the occasional use of Toppik" is my philosophy.
I spoke to a young guy once who's dream was to have enough hair on top so he could use concealor. He had mental health issues but his aims were realistic.

Today's society puts too much emphasis on physical looks. All too often people are influenced by certain individuals, this often leads to disappointment within yourself which then leads you into depression. I don't care what anyone thinks of my appearance these days. I do whatever is best for me.
 
JoeTillman

JoeTillman

Valued member
It's unfortunate but true about how people are influenced by looks. On one side, it is unavoidable since it is a primal instinct and it will always be a part of society, at least until we're all uploaded into our robot bodies, but even then some robots will look better than others. On the other side, it has been over emphasized through marketing and that is the why we have such an epidemic of persons with such low self esteem and the accompanying issues.
 
P

Philwhitehouseuk

member
So true
I remember when I was young and at school, so would have been 1995,if I didn't have the correct trainers or the correct school bag I would have been bullied,but that was just school kids,
Now even adults look down at u if u dont look a certain way
Mobile phones,internet, Facebook etc has made matters X10 times worse
 
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Teh Daddeh

Valued member
It's unfortunate but true about how people are influenced by looks. On one side, it is unavoidable since it is a primal instinct and it will always be a part of society, at least until we're all uploaded into our robot bodies, but even then some robots will look better than others. On the other side, it has been over emphasized through marketing and that is the why we have such an epidemic of persons with such low self esteem and the accompanying issues.
Of course, different societies/cultures value different looks - for example in some cultures being excessively overweight is desirable.

Add to that an individual's personal preference and there will always be someone out there who will find you attractive.

A lady I once knew found the Mitchell brothers on East Enders to be utterly irresistible. Go figure.
 
Bigmac

Bigmac

Administrator
Staff member
Of course, different societies/cultures value different looks - for example in some cultures being excessively overweight is desirable.

Add to that an individual's personal preference and there will always be someone out there who will find you attractive.

This is true but hair loss is a trait that can age a man or woman fast. The impact reflects on your perceived age, making you feel and look older. Other factors such as the condition of your skin or body type can work against you as well but I do think hair has the highest lowering self esteem effect.
 
Dr Arvind

Dr Arvind

Valued member
Hi guys, speaking from experience I was extremely depressed when I started to loose my hair at such a young age, this was made even worse when I rushed into a transplant with the local butcher who made my situation a 1000 times worse.
My depression became so bad I would go out in the early hours of the morning to the local park on foot and sit and cry for hours so my family didnt see....I tried to take my life on 3 separate occasions wich fortunately didn't work.

I did seek help through a psychologist and was in a much better place when I got repaired by Shapiro Medical.

To those who think a transplant is a good idea and will fix all their problems then I would like to express caution because if your not in the right mind set or suffering with mental health prior to having a HT then your probably not going to by happy or satisfied with your results....its crucial you get the mental health side under control before you have a HT so you have realistic expectations and can enjoy your new hair......must be so hard for a doctor as well who gives a patient a great result but due to the patients health it doesnt make them happy.

All I'm saying guys is take care of your mental health it's important... then get a HT.

Has anyone else got any stories of their mental health issues and how their hair loss has affected them and their lives.
I can understand your point of view.
It is also true that hairloss itself can cause a lot of disturbance.
Unlike lifestyle disorders like obesity, baldness is programmed to occur due to the genetic makeup.
When it occurs at a young age, it can be troublesome.
After all, its not the person's fault that he is loosing hair.

So, yes mental issues need to be treated, but at the same time one has to be empathic towards the hairloss problems.

The initial pre HT counselling is very important in this respect.
That is the time that the doctor should not only plan the hair transplant options but also try to get a glimpse of how much hairloss is affecting the person's psychology.
Its a difficult but not impossible issue that needs to be addressed.
Its good you started this topic.
I would like to hear from more young hairloss sufferers.

What will you expect from your hair transplant doctor? Maybe, its not just the patients. Even doctors need to learn.
Regards,
Dr A
 
Bigmac

Bigmac

Administrator
Staff member
Hi Dr Arvind. How would you treat a patient who comes to you with depression that they say has been brought on by their hair loss?
 
H

Hoping_for_hair

member
Totally agree, the more we talk about issues the more it will improve our mental health.

The "clowns" who make the comments don't appreciate how it can make you feel and it can be a much deeper blow than they realise - and probably intended to make.

I know I found that I project my own insecurities about my hair into people's hypothetical opinions of me. Rationally I know this dosent make sense, but it's tough to step back and see it objectively at times.

However it's great to have this forum to talk things through and get support from people who experience the same anxieties around hair loss.
 
H

HairHunter

Valued member
I can relate also to so many of your comments. Aggressive baldness at a young age is a hard pill to swallow.

There is a great guy doing videos on YouTube "bald cafe" he speaks of his journey and decision to shave his head and encourages others on their journey. Worth a watch.

Young guys should be directed down this route to at least see will shaving it off lift the burden. A hairloss battle is a life time commitment, some times worth it and sometimes not.
 
bullitnut

bullitnut

4 awesome repairs with SMG
Just wanted to share this for any men in the UK suffering from depression or loneliness or despair. I know someone who attends one of these groups regularly and he views these guys as his family.

Search for andysmanclub (I can't post the link, sadly)

"OUR WHY
Andy Roberts was loving and doting father, son, brother, grandson, nephew, cousin and friend. He was an all round top guy, one of the truly nicest people.
His love for his daughter was inspirational to see and the way he looked at her and idolised her was a blessing. Sadly and tragically without any warning Andrew, at 23 years old, was taken away from all his family and friends by suicide.
On average one man every 2 hours takes his life in the UK. It’s often said a factor is that men don’t talk. Thats why we were born to break down these stigmas. At ANDYSMANCLUB you don’t have to be suicidal or have a mental health problem, we just want to get men talking.
That change starts with you…"

“Men don’t talk, for three reasons, “They feel a burden, that it’s a weakness, or they’re embarrassed. But it takes a stronger person to say how you’re feeling. To have the confidence to say ‘I have a problem, and I’m struggling in life’. To say that’s weak, well it’s a load of tosh."
I've heard of Andy's Man Club I believe they are based near me in Dewsbury as far as I know? Great post thanks for sharing.

On the topic of Depression related to hair loss I read a news article a few days back talking about how the actor who plays David Platt was going to quit Coronation Street because of the depression he suffered due to his hairloss.....apparently hes feeling much better these days thanks to his Transplants and is glad he didn't quit but it just shows no matter what walk of life you have it can affect you the the same as the next man or women.
 
bullitnut

bullitnut

4 awesome repairs with SMG
I'm glad we met as well. We have become good friends and I'm always here if you're feeling down and need someone to talk to. I know how tough it was for you taking care of your dad and then him passing away, plus the other issues that arose.
I'm glad things are heading in the right direction again.
Remember you're not alone mate.
Thanks pal it's good to know I have a friend I can call on if I need....makes me feel a bit better just knowing that...cheers buddy
 
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